Coaching: How to keep workplace learning a priority

Stephen J. Meyer

Talent development is an obvious ingredient in any organization’s success. But employees also have jobs to do and deadlines to hit. Which can explain why workplace learning can get neglected and pushed to the bottom of to-do lists. Think about using importance and urgency as the primary factors in prioritizing tasks. We’d end up with…

Flipped learning: Yes, it works — if you can shift your mindset

Stephen J. Meyer

It’s a concept that’s been circulating in learning circles since the 1990s and was popularized by Salman Khan in the last decade: “Flip” the traditional instructional design model so that learners acquire knowledge outside of the classroom/learning event and use the event itself as an opportunity to apply and practice that knowledge. In other words, learn on…

Workplace learning: Do employee rewards work?

Stephen J. Meyer

Lately, traditional workplace rewards have been seriously reevaluated, both in research circles and in forward-thinking companies (think: Silicon Valley). For knowledge workers, research suggests that bonuses and other conditional benefits that companies used to motivate their employees for decades could actually decrease employee motivation. Here’s a quick summary: If an employee’s job involves doing something…

Want to boost learner engagement? Try this

Stephen J. Meyer

An emerging area of educational research has found a specific quality that has a big impact on learner engagement. It makes learning more enjoyable. It boosts memory. And it can significantly improve the performance of learners, even those who are struggling. Curious to find out what it is? The research Researchers at UC Davis wanted…

E-Learning: Watch out for this learner pitfall

Stephen J. Meyer

Once we get a little bit of information, we are extremely likely to overestimate what we know. A recent study found that people who recently searched the internet for information on a topic vastly inflated how much they knew about said topic. What’s worse, they also inflated how much they knew about a variety of other topics they didn’t even research. 

Learning: The power of positivity

Stephen J. Meyer

The power of a positive attitude: It’s been heralded as a key to success in many areas of life, from learning to athletics to just about any profession you can imagine. But is there any evidence that positivity affects results or is it mostly mumbo jumbo? In reality, it’s difficult to separate a person’s attitude…

Your rock star employees don’t need training, right? Wrong

Stephen J. Meyer

It’s easy to see why your organization would conduct workplace learning for low and average performers. These employees have discernable room to grow and develop. But what about high performers? On some level, high performers have already harnessed their potential and tasted success. They meaningfully contribute to the organization in a tangible, measurable way. Best…

Boost learners’ recall with this simple practice technique

Stephen J. Meyer

Not all practice techniques are created equal. In fact, studies have shown that, when left to their own devices, learners typically don’t practice effectively or efficiently – if they practice at all. So when it comes to practice, learners need guidance. Especially when the stakes are high. Imagine, for example, your learners need to remember…

‘I already know this stuff’: How to handle overconfident learners

Stephen J. Meyer

People tend to overestimate their own abilities. Countless studies have demonstrated that people routinely misjudge both how much they know and how well they’ll perform. What’s worse, lower performers tend to overestimate their abilities even more than average or high performers.

Think your learners know how to learn? That’s great, but it’s not enough

Stephen J. Meyer

In your workplace learning program, you give your learners the skills they need to succeed on the job. But you also likely provide them with strategies they can use to make that learning stick. There are no shortage of learning techniques supported by research that can help learners remember new information, stay motivated and improve…

Of course learners shouldn’t beat themselves up… or should they?

Stephen J. Meyer

A research team based at the University of Kansas conducted a study to analyze how reactions to failure affect future performance. Specifically, they compared a cognitive response to failure — thoughts on what happened and why — with an emotional response — how failing made them feel.