Health plans: The cost of reform

by on January 11, 2010 · 6 Comments POSTED IN: HR Cafe
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What will happen to your health plan premiums if health care reform passes Congress?

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has just put a provisional price tag on the bill now being considered by the Senate.

And according to the CBO, you haven’t got much to worry about — if you’re a large employer. Your premiums aren’t expected to change from what they would be if no health reform were enacted.

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That’s because the plans offered by larger employers in most cases already meet the Senate bill’s minimum coverage requirements.

The picture could be a little different for smaller employers — those with under 50 employees. If that’s you, your premiums could be about 1 percent higher by 2016 than they would have been absent health reform.

But watch out: The CBO put a big caveat on its estimates, saying that if health reform meets its goal of raising the number of insured employees, this could spark increased consumption of medical services. And this, in turn, could cause health insurance premiums to rise faster than the CBO now estimates.

photo credit: quinn.anya

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6 Comments on This Post

  1. Mike
    January 11, 2010 - 6:29 pm

    Why wouldn’t the CBO calculate it estimate based on the assumptiong that health care reform would meet its goal of raising the number of insured employees? Isn’t that why the issue is being addressed? I guess the government wants to publish low numbers so that everyone would just accept the plan; however, if they provided the most likely more realistic number all hell would break loose.

  2. Mike
    January 11, 2010 - 6:29 pm

    Why wouldn’t the CBO calculate it estimate based on the assumptiong that health care reform would meet its goal of raising the number of insured employees? Isn’t that why the issue is being addressed? I guess the government wants to publish low numbers so that everyone would just accept the plan; however, if they provided the most likely more realistic number all hell would break loose.

  3. Mike
    January 11, 2010 - 1:29 pm

    Why wouldn't the CBO calculate it estimate based on the assumptiong that health care reform would meet its goal of raising the number of insured employees? Isn't that why the issue is being addressed? I guess the government wants to publish low numbers so that everyone would just accept the plan; however, if they provided the most likely more realistic number all hell would break loose.

  4. Mike
    January 11, 2010 - 1:29 pm

    Why wouldn't the CBO calculate it estimate based on the assumptiong that health care reform would meet its goal of raising the number of insured employees? Isn't that why the issue is being addressed? I guess the government wants to publish low numbers so that everyone would just accept the plan; however, if they provided the most likely more realistic number all hell would break loose.

  5. March 29, 2010 - 8:02 am

    Health Insurance audits can help reduce high health care premiums

  6. March 29, 2010 - 8:02 am

    Health Insurance audits can help reduce high health care premiums

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